Our Mission

For the newcomer to the teachings of Judaism as well as for those well versed in Torah knowledge, we provide material of unparalleled quality and authenticity. We will continue to satisfy the thirst for knowledge for which our people, the "People of the Book" have always been identified.

Our History

1941
11 Tishrei, 1941
First publication released: Sefer HaShana
1941
20 Cheshvan, 1941
Kuntres HaTfillah by Rabbi Sholom DovBer of Lubavitch is published and is the first sefer of Chasidut Chabad printed by Kehot
1942
Chanukah 1942
Launch of the Talks and Tales/Shmuessn Mit Kinder Un Yugent, monthly children's magazine
1945
1945
First volume of Toras Shmuel, first in series of discourses by Rabbi Shmuel of Lubavitch is published
1946
1946
Launch of the Our People series
1948
Rosh Chodesh Sivan, 1948
Likutei Torah is printed
1950
1950
First volume of Or HaTorah, first in series of discourses Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Lubavitch, is published
1952
1952
Tehillim Ohel Yosef Yitchok is first published
1953
1953
New edition of Tanya with foreword by the Lubavitcher Rebbe is published and is also first Tanya printed in America
1957
1957
First in series of discourses by Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi is published
1960
1960
Shulchan Aruch Harav is published for the first time in the United states with foreword by the Lubavitcher Rebbe
1962
11 Nissan, 1962
First volume of Likutei Sichot is published
1970
1970
5666 series of discourses by Rabbi Sholom DovBer of Lubavitch is published
1970
1970
First volume of the Chabad Encyclopedia is published
1973
1973
First Bilingual Tanya is published
1977
1977
5772 series of discourses by Rabbi Sholom DovBer of Lubavitch is published
1978
1978
First Bilingual Siddur is published
1981
1981
Early draft of the Tanya is published
1984
1984
First in series of discourses by Rabbi Dovber of Lubavitch is published
1987
1987
Lessons in Tanya, an elucidation of the Tanya in english is published
1990
1990
New edition of Torah Ohr, featuring new typeface is published
2001
2001
Begins publishing new edition of Shulchan Aruch HaRav
2001
2001
Launch of the Chasidic Heritage Series with publication of Yom Tov Shel Rosh Hashana
2002
2002
Launch of the Annotated Series with the publication of Annotated Siddur
2004
2004
Launch of the Torah series with publication of the book of Bamidbar
2010
2010
New edition of 5666 series of discourses by Rabbi Sholom DovBer of Lubavitch is published
2014
28 Sivan, 2014
Launch of the Historical Sketches series with publication of The Life and Times of Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi
2015
2015
First volume of fully vowelized compact edition of the Shulchan Aruch HaRav is published

For every milestone in life.

The Rebbe has indicated that the publication of a Torah book is the ultimate way to celebrate a festive family occasion and the finest memorial one could establish for a dear departed one.

Browse the ultimate catalog of Jewish discovery!

Chabad’s publishing arm has produced the ultimate guide to English-language discovery, discourse and gift-giving. Featuring 75 pages of groundbreaking new volumes, classic publications and historical and inspirational notes.

Why We Count The Omer

You Must Count for Yourselves
Seven Weeks.

Vayikra 23:15


SEFIRAT HA'OMER

Even though, when the Temple is not standing, we cannot offer up the Omer of barley on the second day of Passover, we still commence counting the 50 days "of the Omer" from that day. The days of "counting the Omer" act as the bridge between our annual reliving of the Exodus from Egypt (on Passover) and our annual reliving of the Giving of the Torah (on Shavuot).

The Jewish people did not "earn" the Exodus; in fact, G-d had to "artificially" give them something to do in order to merit their redemption in at least some small way. Thus, G-d took the initiative in the Exodus, pulling His people out of their spiritual and physical bondage despite their unworthiness. Because they were not redeemed on their own merits, their redemption could not transform them in any way. Spiritually, their human/animal souls remained unrefined despite the experience. For this reason, the spiritual effect of the Exodus was temporary; the spiritual danger represented by Egypt still remained.

The revelation at Mount Sinai, however, was a lasting and meaningful one, which indeed transformed them, and us for all time. It was here that they received the full manifestation of their Divine souls, after internalizing the Exodus, the Splitting of the Sea, and all the incidents that occurred en route to Mount Sinai.

We undergo this same dynamic in our annual reliving of the Exodus and the Giving of the Torah. Just as G-d miraculously renews nature each spring, He re-inspires us each Passover, freeing us from the wintry, depressing bondage to the forces of physical and spiritual entropy rooted in the materialistic consciousness of our human/animal soul. However, since this quantum leap (Pesach, the Hebrew name of Passover, means "jump") is largely His doing, it cannot transform us in any lasting way. That can be accomplished only by a renewed acceptance of the Torah on Shavuot, and the way we prepare for Shavuot is through counting the Omer.

Our human/animal soul comprises both intellect and emotions. Rectifying the emotions of the human/animal soul requires arduous work, since the emotions themselves have to be recast, not only reoriented. This process therefore is more complicated, and is accomplished by the seven-week process of counting the Omer.

Our emotional makeup, including that of our human/animal souls, derives from the seven emotional attributes through which G-d created the world and continues to relate to it.

In childhood, these emotions are "one-dimensional," i.e., absolute and unmitigated. In contrast, the emotions of mature adults have been tempered by their intellect, so they are less extreme and intense. On the other hand, it is fairly easy to calm a child's emotions, since they are not as stable as those of an adult, whereas those of an adult, being more solidly grounded in the intellect, are harder to change. Thus, the process of maturation may be described as the process whereby the intellect learns how to influence the emotions.

This is the process we undergo through counting the Omer. Each week, in turn, we refine one of the seven emotions of our human/animal soul by submitting it to the guidance of the intellect.

During the seven days of each week, we add another emotional dimension to the emotion we are focusing on that week.

Each day thus presents us with a very specific and clear objective: to work on and refine one aspect of our human/animal soul's emotional makeup. Through this process, this soul matures and is ready to welcome the renewed manifestation of our Divine soul that takes place when we relive the Giving of the Torah on Shavuot.

--From Kehot's Chumash Vayikra